Great Peninsula Conservancy hires new executive director

Nathan Daniel takes over for executive director, Sandra Staples-Bortner, who recently retired

  • Sunday, June 2, 2019 11:30am
  • News

The Great Peninsula Conservancy announced Nathan Daniel will be serving as its new executive director on May 31.

Daniel has over a decade of experience in land conservation, outdoor education and nonprofit management. He takes over leadership of GPC following the recent retirement of longtime executive director Sandra Staples-Bortner.

“The board is confident that Nate will help Great Peninsula Conservancy continue its successful record of protecting the lands and waters of our region,” Board President Kit Ellis said. “He brings a wealth of experience and a passion for conservation and community engagement.”

In 2013, Daniel co-founded Truckee Meadows Park Foundation in Reno, Nevada, where he held the position of executive director for the last six years. In that role, Daniel worked to protect and advocate for public lands in the eastern Sierra Nevada mountains.

“I have always believed I could make the greatest impact through work that preserves and restores ecologically valuable lands while connecting people to nature,” Daniel said. “Now I have an incredible opportunity to carry out that work here on the peninsula with GPC’s amazing staff, board of directors, and community members. It’s truly humbling, and I can’t wait to get started.”

Daniel holds an Master of Science degree in Environmental Science from Ohio University. He has worked with the National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service on projects related to climate change and engaging young people in conservation. He spent time in Great Smoky Mountains National Park as an educator and naturalist. He also served two years as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Russian Far East and one year in East Timor.

“Nate brings wonderful people skills to this position and is very experienced in working with a wide range of groups,” Ellis said. “He’s a good listener and is enthusiastically learning about what makes the Great Peninsula so special.”

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