Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. (Washington State Legislature photo)

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. (Washington State Legislature photo)

New laws enacted affect courthouse arrests, hairstyles and domestic worker treatment

HB 2567 prohibits warrantless arrests within one mile of a court facility

OLYMPIA — Several bills poised to become signed into law this legislative session would directly affect many Washington residents.

House Bill 2567, which would outlaw arrests for civil matters at courthouses unless there is a warrant issued, passed the House earlier and was approved by the Senate on Wednesday, Mar. 4.

When signed into law, the measure will protect undocumented residents by prohibiting warrantless civil arrests within one mile of a court facility.

“This bill is about nothing more or less than the proposition that all residents of our state ought to have access to our courts to seek justice,” said Sen. Jamie Pedersen, D-Seattle, during an earlier Senate floor debate.

“All of the residents, regardless of their immigration status, should feel comfortable and safe coming to our courts to seek the assistance that they need,” Pedersen said.

HB 2602, which also passed in both legislative chambers and is set to be signed into law, redefines the Washington Law Against Discrimination to include in the definition of race hair textures and styles, such as afros and braids, that are historically associated with African Americans.

“This is a very simple bill,” Pedersen said at the earlier debate. “We had very compelling testimony from people, particularly African Americans, whose hairstyles have subjected them to discrimination, particularly in the employment context,” Pedersen said.

HB 2511 has also been approved by both chambers and will protect a domestic worker from discrimination, as well as their general safety, health and well-being. It also puts into place a workgroup for domestic worker issues.

“The bill before us does begin the process of building a bill of rights for domestic workers and creates a workgroup that will look at how do we make sure that we do properly value those that care for our young ones and our elders,” said Sen. Rebecca Saldana, D-Seattle, who sponsored the bill’s companion, SB 6247.

More in News

26 active cases of COVID-19 reported in Kitsap Thursday

So far, 18 positive cases have been reported in July

CHI Franciscan opens new Family Medicine Clinic

Clinic provides outpatient care such as obstetrics, pediatrics, sports health, addiction treatment.

Washington State Parks ‘roofed accommodations’ now available for rent

Bainbridge Island Metropolitan Parks & Recreation District cabins also available for rent

Demonstrators gather in downtown Poulsbo on July 3, the one year anniversary after the fatal police shooting of Stonechild Chiefstick. Photo Courtesy Suquamish Tribe
Memorial caravan honors Chiefstick on anniversary of fatal shooting

Exactly one year after Stonechild Chiefstick, of the Chippewa Cree tribe of… Continue reading

South Kitsap Fire and Rescue Chief Steve Wright has retired from the agency after 34 years of service in the county. He now is executive director of the Washington Fire Chiefs Association in Olympia. (Bob Smith | Kitsap Daily News file photo)
Chief Wright retires, Jeff Faucett fills his boots at SKFR

Wright now leading Washington Fire Chief Association in Olympia

Small aircraft crashes near Mullenix Road in South Kitsap

Pilot trapped inside on-fire plane, taken to Harborview with critical injuries

Outbreaks a concern for board of health as cases rise in Kitsap

For the moment, Kitsap County is managing the COVID-19 pandemic, but worries… Continue reading

COVID-19 infections continue to rise in Kitsap County

22 active cases of COVID-19, 267 total infections since March

NKSD will use hybrid learning model next school year

Each school will split students into two groups for remote and in-person learning

Most Read