North Kitsap Herald Letters to the Editor | July 19

I’ve had it. The county and other agencies and researchers keep complaining about the low oxygen level at the lower end of the Hood Canal. I have swum and fished and visited all over Puget Sound since the early 1930s. Now humans are being blamed for pollution largely by septic systems and alder tree residues washing into the canal. The nitrogen and coliform levels produced by sea mammals has never, repeat never, been made public. There are an estimated 200,000 seals and sea lions in the Puget Sound system and they are polluting everywhere.

Hood Canal

Seals pollute, too

I’ve had it. The county and other agencies and researchers keep complaining about the low oxygen level at the lower end of the Hood Canal. I have swum and fished and visited all over Puget Sound since the early 1930s. Now humans are being blamed for pollution largely by septic systems and alder tree residues washing into the canal. The nitrogen and coliform levels produced by sea mammals has never, repeat never, been made public. There are an estimated 200,000 seals and sea lions in the Puget Sound system and they are polluting everywhere.

I almost never saw a seal or sea lion anywhere until the 1970s when the marine mammal protection act went into effect and then their population exploded. Just take a look at the sea lions basking on the submarines at Bangor and the seals snatching fish from the fishermen’s lines at Point No Point. The total pollution they put out is equivalent to a large city, and yet the county continues to blame the homeowners’ septic system (and alder? Are they a new recent species?).

Please direct the researchers to give the public a definite number as to the amount of nitrogen and bacteria put out by these animals compared to the rest of the pollution sources. Only then, after such definite information, can you act rationally and the public can decide on the subject. The people deserve a definite answer.

James Mauser

Hansville

Fireworks

It’s craziness

The discharge of fireworks and the resulting disrupting noise and debris is just insane. Concern about the price of gasoline and commodities seem to be of no importance as people have money to burn on fireworks.

The ultimate was the discharge of fireworks on July 5, by one family in the residential area known as Indianola. The noise and shock generated was the equivalent of a home invasion, personal assault and breach of the peace. Not to disregard the terrorizing of cats and dogs. These giant fireworks cost a lot of money. Think of the benefit that would have accrued had these dollars been donated to the Red Cross or Salvation Army.

There are, at present, concerns about the conditions of Puget Sound. How does the residue from the components of fireworks falling into the Salt Chuck affect its condition?

Earle L. Willey

Indianola

Adele

Check your facts

I write in response to the column by Adele Ferguson in the July 12 edition.

Although it is now the general consensus among scientists that the world is experiencing a climate change and that human activity is contributing to it, Adele Ferguson continues to follow her ideological commitment to no climate change. She writes that ‘numerous scientists’ are on both sides of the issue. In actually the vast majority of scientists recognize that climate change is happening and that we contribute to it.

For every scientist that Adele Ferguson can name who support her position, I can name twenty who oppose it.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is an international group of scientists who were appointed to study the issue and make reports. Scientists from all countries are welcome to participate in the studies. Over the past couple decades they have made reports; the latest report (named AR4) was made in 2007. It is far too lengthy to print here, but you are welcome to view the report online athttp://ipcc-wg1.ucar.edu/. The report is divided into many sections to which you may refer. I found it most helpful to click on the reference to Frequently Asked Questions. Here is one short quote: “An increase (0.35°C) occurred in the global average temperature from the 1910s to the 1940s, followed by a slight cooling (0.1°C), and then a rapid warming (0.55°C) up to the end of 2006.” Although this sounds small, the cumulative effect on climate change is significant. A later paragraph cites the melting that is happening on the Greenland ice cap. I hope that Adele Ferguson will read that.

Edward Roe

Silverdale

Save Our Pool

Youth speaks out

My name is Crystal and I am writing to you about the Save the Pool fundraiser. Just last year I was recommended by my swim coach to swim internationally. I went to Amsterdam to compete against other kids who were nominated in swimming. They were from all over the world.

I truly believe that if anybody is going to achieve big dreams that the NK pool is where you should begin. I find it unbelievable that NKSD is planning on closing the pool on Aug. 31 if we can’t raise enough money. I began my swimming career at the NK pool when I was 8 and just look at how far I’ve come at the age of 13. If the pool closes we would have no place to practice and our swimming careers would go down the drain. Now think about that. I hope the community comes together to raise the money needed so kids like me can keep achieving big dreams.

Crystal Jose

Poulsbo

Thanks, community

The Save Our Pool organization would like to recognize the following individuals who have pledged or donated to our efforts to keep the North Kitsap Community Pool open. To date we have raised over $30,000 in pledges and donations. Over $1,000: Paul and Cynthia Jose, Bruce Morrison, Ada Ulmer. Over $2,000: Kregg Hoover, DDS.Over $5,000: S’Klallam Tribe. There are many donors that have contributed under $1,000 and the support of those donors is greatly appreciated. Keep up the excellent work everyone.

Randy Borek

Poulsbo