(photo from Suquamish Tribe)

(photo from Suquamish Tribe)

Suquamish Foundation celebrates giving on Indigenous Peoples Day

On Indigenous Peoples Day, the Suquamish Tribe released a new video showcasing the Tribe’s charitable giving.

For the vast majority of the nation, Monday, Oct. 14 marked Columbus Day, a federal holiday named for the Italian explorer and colonizer Christopher Columbus, that has been recognized since 1934.

Each year the Suquamish Tribe donates more than half a million dollars to nonprofits, projects that benefit the community, sponsorships, and first responders, primarily in Kitsap County. As part of Indigenous Peoples Day, the tribe wanted to highlight some of the organizations that have received substantial donations over the course of the last year in a video that can be found on the tribe’s Facebook page.

“We find the people in the community who need the most help and are doing good work, who are the unsung heroes,” said Robin Sigo, a member of the Suquamish Tribal Council and Executive Director of the Suquamish Foundation. “Those are the people we want to give money to.”

Kids in Concert is a local nonprofit organization that teaches children to play music, providing instruments and lessons free of charge.

“The day we found out we had a grant from the Tribe was amazing!” Laura Milleson, Artistic Director said. “As a nonprofit, we are always wondering if we can keep our doors open.“

The Poulsbo Fire Department used funding from the Tribe to purchase an electric stretcher, which has reduced back injuries among their first responders by 75 percent, according to Deputy Chief Jeff Russell.

The Tribe has also made an ongoing commitment to Kitsap Strong, which uses the funding to increase resilience and awareness of trauma and to build bridges among area agencies. Among their partners is the Peninsula Community Health Services, also featured in the video.

“It’s the Suquamish Tribe, and their vision around investing in relationships that have helped make Kitsap Strong what it is,” said Kody Russell, Executive Director of Kitsap Strong.

“This is the work we should be doing, this is what is making Kitsap County a better place, and seeing people with the strength of resilience in their eyes, seeing people working together, those are the things that change communities,” Sigo said. “They change lives and I want us to continue to do that.”

More information about the Suquamish Foundation’s grant programs can be found at suquamish.nsn.us/home/suq-foundation/grant-programs.

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