A beach naturalist carefully removes a Sea Star from one of the dock pilings so it can be displayed in the fish tank. The Sea Star and other living things in the tank were carefully returned to the water at the conclusion of the Pier Peer.                                Terryl Asla/Kitsap News Group

A beach naturalist carefully removes a Sea Star from one of the dock pilings so it can be displayed in the fish tank. The Sea Star and other living things in the tank were carefully returned to the water at the conclusion of the Pier Peer. Terryl Asla/Kitsap News Group

Pier Peer: Participants explore our local undersea world

BROWNSVILLE — The winds were calm the evening of March 10. The moon was so bright that you didn’t need a flash to take a picture.

That was what it was like for 175 children and grown-ups gathered on the breakwater at Brownsville Marina for the third annual Pier Peer.

They hung over the sides of the dock with their flashlights, peering at the sea anemones and tubeworms. They watched a video monitor as naturalist-in-training Jeremy Fitchett maneuvered an underwater camera alongside the pier. They peered at the sea creatures in the large fish tank. Most of all, they listened to Kitsap beach naturalists from Washington State University Kitsap County Extension and Washington Sea Grant describe what they were seeing.

This was last Pier Peer of the winter season.

”As always, our goal is to shine a light on the amazing sea life that flourishes in the dark winter waters of Puget Sound,” said Renée Johnson of the Water Stewardship Program at WSU Kitsap County Extension.

Besides the two government agencies, the event was sponsored by the Brownsville Yacht Club, the Kitsap Maritime Heritage Foundation and the Port of Brownsville.

Terryl Asla is a reporter for the Kitsap News Group. He can be reached at tasla@soundpublishing.com.

Inquisitive children peer into the fish tank with their flashlights while a beach naturalist explains what they are seeing.                                Terryl Asla/Kitsap News Group

Inquisitive children peer into the fish tank with their flashlights while a beach naturalist explains what they are seeing. Terryl Asla/Kitsap News Group

Adults examine the sea life on pier pilings while flashlights illuminate the underwater sides of the floating of the floating concrete docks.                                TerrylAsla/Kitsap News Group

Adults examine the sea life on pier pilings while flashlights illuminate the underwater sides of the floating of the floating concrete docks. TerrylAsla/Kitsap News Group

Pier Peer: Participants explore our local undersea world

Adults examine the sea life on pier pilings while flashlights illuminate the underwater sides of the floating of the floating concrete docks. TerrylAsla/Kitsap News Group

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