State senators vote on legislation weeks before the session is scheduled to end April 28. (Washington State Senate photo)

State senators vote on legislation weeks before the session is scheduled to end April 28. (Washington State Senate photo)

26th Legislative District lawmakers vote on bills in final weeks of the session.

How did they vote?

How did state lawmakers from the 26th Legislative District vote on bills in Olympia last week?

WashingtonVotes.org tallied legislative roll call votes on a number of major bills up for consideration. Highlighting the week’s roll call votes are bills considered key agenda items for Gov. Inslee and his fellow Democrats, who control both chambers of the state Legislature.

SB 5116, the “clean energy future” measure, and the public-option subsidized health insurance bill, SB 5526, were up for consideration. SB 5116 passed the House April 11 by a vote of 56-42. The bill passed the state Senate on March 1 on a party-line 28-19 vote.

House members Reps. Michelle Caldier and Jesse Young, both Republicans, voted no on SB 5116.

HB 1523, the House version of Senate Bill 5526, which would create a subsidized state-funded public health plan, would require the state insurance commissioner and the Health Care Authority to set up plans by 2021 with insurance companies that offer qualified plans in Washington state.

The bill passed the Senate last month by a 36-13 vote following approval of the House version of the bill. The final version of the bill was incorporated in SB 5526 and also passed by a party-line vote. Caldier voted no on the measure and Young was excused.

Other significant votes last week:

House Bill 1101, concerning state general obligation bonds and related accounts, failed to pass in the Senate April 8 by a vote of 26-21 (60 percent of Senate members were required to approve its passage). The bill would have authorized more than $3.08 billion in general obligation bonds to help finance the proposed state capital budget that would provide for $5.26 billion in construction and infrastructure projects statewide for the 2019-21 biennium. The House unanimously passed a $4.4 billion capital budget (HB 1102) along with a $3.1 billion bond authorization bill two weeks ago.

Sen. Emily Randall, D-Bremerton, voted in favor of the bill.

HB 1742, concerning juvenile offenses that would exclude minors from felony crimes involving dealing in depictions of a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct, would also create a new class of crimes that apply exclusively for minors. It would limit the crime of a minor dealing in depictions of another minor 13 years of age or older engaged in sexually explicit conduct to a gross misdemeanor.

The bill passed the House last month on a 57-39 vote. It now goes back to the House to reconcile the House and Senate versions of the bill. Randall voted in favor of the bill in the Senate.

HB 1817, mandating a skilled and trained workforce in high hazard facilities, passed the Senate April 10 by a vote of 29-16. The bill would require owners and operators of oil refineries to require their contractors and subcontractors to use a skilled and trained workforce to perform onsite work. Randall voted in favor of the bill.

The bill, which passed in the House on a 64-32 vote, goes back to the House for a reconciliation of amendments passed by the Senate.

This year’s session is scheduled to adjourn April 28.

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