Election workers stand outside the Kitsap County Elections Division office in Port Orchard on Monday to collect envelopes containing election ballots from a registered voter. (Bob Smith | Kitsap Daily News)

Election workers stand outside the Kitsap County Elections Division office in Port Orchard on Monday to collect envelopes containing election ballots from a registered voter. (Bob Smith | Kitsap Daily News)

2020 Election: Kitsap incumbents leading, state races predictable

Garrido, Gelder to return to Kitsap Board of Commissioners

PORT ORCHARD — In a general election that in many ways is mimicking 2016 in its unpredictability in the race for President, initial results issued by Kitsap County’s Election Division followed a more traditional pattern with incumbents taking Tuesday night leads.

While the battle for the U.S. presidency took a surprisingly tight turn nationally, the Democratic Party’s vise grip on state offices tightened even more as Mike Pellicciotti ousted Duane A. Davidson, a Republican, from his post as state treasurer. The sole remaining Republican who retained a state seat was Kim Wyman, who edged well-financed Democrat Gael Tarleton to keep her position as secretary of state.

Here is a recap of results received from Kitsap County Tuesday night:

South Kitsap Fire and Rescue Proposition 1

Voters in Kitsap County Fire Protection District No. 7 voted to approve a $39.5 million capital bond measure by a 59 percent to 41 percent margin — but fell short of the bond measure’s 60-percent approval requirement in initial returns. The measure would have authorized the district to combine and replace five fire stations with three new stations, remodel the headquarters campus and make seismic upgrades to stations in the district.

26th State Legislative District – Position 1

Republican Jesse L. Young, the incumbent state representative for Position 1 since 2014, is leading his challenger, Democrat Carrie Hesch, 51 percent to 49 percent, in results from Kitsap, Pierce and Mason counties. He has a lead over Hesch of just 733 votes.

Young has been something of a firebrand in the state Legislature by supporting various populist, conservative causes during his time in office, managed to withstand his Democratic challenger. Hesch is a first-time candidate who is the director of recreation and athletics at the Washington Corrections Center for Women in Purdy.

26th Legislative District – Position 2

In a rematch of 2018, state Rep. Michelle Caldier, the incumbent Republican representative for Position 2 faced off against her Democratic challenger Joy Stanford. Caldier, who trailed in Kitsap County primary returns, surged to a 53 percent to 46 percent victory over Stanford.

Caldier campaigned as a moderate Republican who has reached across the aisle to develop policy changes for sexual assault survivors and foster children. Stanford, a substitute teacher and former Medicare consultant for Group Health Cooperative, leveraged her strengthened support by advocating for greater access to affordable health care and housing.

23rd State Legislative District

Incumbent Sen. Christine Rolfes, D, easily beat Republican challenger Pam Madden Boyer by a 67 percent to 33 percent margin.

Rolfes is chairwoman of the Senate Ways and Means Committee and a former state representative and Bainbridge Island councilmember. She ran on her record of historical funding for K-12 schools, expansion of workforce training and financial aid, reducing college tuition, helping military families and the clean energy law. She committed to rebuilding the economy, schools and businesses, and improving the environment and public health system.

Madden-Boyer said government response to COVID-19 did more harm than good, and she would work toward a healthy environment and a prosperous economy.

Democrat Tara Simmons, who was appointed to an open seat by Gov. Jay Inslee, beat April Ferguson, R, for an open seat for Position 1, 65 percent to 35 percent.

Simmons, a civil rights lawyer and former nurse, said she’s already been able to reach across party lines. She plans to rebuild the economy, expand access to health care and education, and protect clean air and water.

Ferguson promised to fight against taxes and over-regulation of businesses. She said she would fight too much government and for individual rights.

Position 2 incumbent Drew Hanson, D, beat Republican Elaina Gonzales-Blanton, 65 percent to 35 percent.

Hansen said he is focused on protecting people from COVID so Kitsap County can open safely. He helped bring new college opportunities to the county and wrote a law that would make college more affordable.

Gonzales-Blanton said she would battle over-regulation and excessive taxes and listen to the people because this government isn’t listening.

35th Legislative District

The two incumbents, Dan Griffey and Drew MacEwen, both won comfortably in their races against Democratic opponents. Griffey beat Colton Myers, 56 percent to 44 percent, and MacEwen edged Darcy Huffman, 55 to 45 percent.

Kitsap County Board of Commissioners

Position 1 incumbent Robert Gelder, D, easily beat Scott Henden, R, 58 percent to 42 percent.

Gelder said he obtained funding to address gridlock at the Kingston ferry, added 4,000 acres of open space and helped pass a sales tax to help those with mental health and substance abuse issues. Affordable housing, transportation infrastructure, job growth and the permit process are things he plans to focus on next term.

Henden said COVID closures locally are fear-driven, not data-driven. He supports private businesses, affordable housing and fewer taxes.

For Position 2, incumbent Charlotte Garrido, D, topped challenger Oran R. Root, R, 56 percent to 44 percent of the vote.

A strong economy, healthy environment and working together are Garrido’s priorities. She also supports public health, local businesses and workers, people in need and to maintain transportation systems.

Root said he would support small businesses hurt by the shutdown and rein in the county budget. He said funding should be prioritized for public safety, infrastructure, roads, and the health and welfare of residents.

Kitsap County’s Election Division is releasing election updates at about 5:30 p.m. each weekday until all election ballot envelopes, postmarked by Nov. 3, are counted and certified.

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Election ballots that have arrived at Kitsap County’s Election Division are fed through a sorting machine on Monday. (Bob Smith | Kitsap Daily News)

Election ballots that have arrived at Kitsap County’s Election Division are fed through a sorting machine on Monday. (Bob Smith | Kitsap Daily News)

Madison Andrews (right) and Allison Brazil, election workers at the Kitsap County Elections Division in Port Orchard, gather and sort arriving election ballot envelopes Monday at the county’s administration building. (Bob Smith | Kitsap Daily News)

Madison Andrews (right) and Allison Brazil, election workers at the Kitsap County Elections Division in Port Orchard, gather and sort arriving election ballot envelopes Monday at the county’s administration building. (Bob Smith | Kitsap Daily News)

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