North Kitsap

“Inslee, school districts warn of high-tech job crises”

"Washington will face a job crisis unless schools start teaching technological skills earlier in their curriculum, according to Rep. Jay Inslee. It's going to be the great bombshell that will explode on this country, Inslee said. Inslee met Sept.1 with vocational school administrators from districts comprising the West Sound Consortium. They discussed how Washington schools can increase the number of students leaving high school with high-tech skills. Consortium members, citing a study by the American Electronics Association, said the state and nation are falling behind the demand for high-tech workers. Although the number of high-tech jobs grew 21 percent between 1990 and 1998 in the U.S., the number of high-tech degrees dropped five percent. The study said Washington schools should hope to supply at least technical workers a year by 2008 to keep up with the number of jobs available."

Across America

"SUQUAMISH - At first, Colin McDonald wasn't sure about the senior trip his older brother Ross suggested. Colin, who is now 19, was about to graduate from North Kitsap High School, and his brother kept talking about this trip, a bike ride. But Colin was hesitant. I said no, he said. Then after that I said nothing, then at Christmas, our aunt bought us some tents. The boys' mother, Bethany McDonald, explains, The family had invested in it. So Colin agreed, and the boys starting planning for this trip: a bike ride across the United States. It seemed like a fun ride, Ross, 21, said. He graduated from Western Washington University and will begin graduate studies at the University of Washington in the fall. I had been at school a long time, and wanted something to do before I returned for more schooling. The trip, which was to wind through the northern United States, soon became a family affair in more ways than one. "

“For sports, schools are the place to be”

Twenty reasons junior and high-school sports are better than the pros...

Shoreline owners want answers

"County provides some, but admits to not knowing everything yet. "

Speed Up! Kill a kid

If you speed down Caldart or Finn Hill or Miller Bay or Lincoln or Kingston Rd. or any of your other favorite short cuts-there's a good chance your speeding could kill a kid.

A preview of NK football

"POULSBO - It wasn't quite football. Sure, players crunched into each other in the trenches. And receivers stretched themselves out for fingertip catches. And when flags flew, some eyes rolled. But Saturday's jamboree, held at the North Kitsap High School field, was just for practice. North Kitsap was one of the four teams that participated. They joined North Mason, Klahowya and Bainbridge Island. An offensive and defensive team of each school occupied one-fourth of the field, so two games could go at once. So while North Mason's defense may be facing Bainbridge's offense on one end, North Mason's offense may be facing North Kitsap's defense on another. The purpose was for each team to get in some practice before the games start for real next week. Each match would continue for a specific number of plays. "

Recycling Center will open bins Sept. 12

Long-awaited facility to start crunching on Viking Way.

New teacher strikes up the band

"POULSBO - When rain threatened their instruments, the participants in North Kitsap High School's band camp marched across the field anyway, fingers curled around imaginary flutes and arms encircling invisible tubas. And when they couldn't play their instruments - dark clouds still gathered overhead - they sang the parts instead, the drummer laughing as he shouted, Boom-BOOM! Boom-BOOM! It's that kind of imagination and dedication that Sara Weyrick stepped into. Weyrick is the new band teacher and director at North Kitsap High School, replacing John Werth. Weyrick has shown her share of dedication, commuting from and to Issaquah until the sale of her new home in Poulsbo closes. It's a four-hour trip every day, she said. "

What should Kingston look like?

Planning commission to continue public discussions Sept. 26.

“New faces, tricks open KJH season”

"KINGSTON - The players aren't loud enough for Tony Chisholm. So Chisholm, the head football coach at Kingston Junior High, holds one hand into the air, four fingers aloft, and asks the question again. What do four fingers stand for? He asks, and this time the response comes thundering back: Four quarters! Chisholm smiles at the sea of helmeted athletes in front of him. Chisholm has been with the KJH football program since its creation six years ago. For four years he served as an assistant under head coaches Tom Wiley and Scott McKay. The last two years he has been on his own, and the Cavaliers have tallied 6-1 and 5-2 records in those years. "

Big Valley llamas touch the hearts of the blind

"POULSBO - I think it is almost like a swan with their long curved necks, said Mussie Gebre, describing one of the star attractions at Llama Rose Farm and Gardens Thursday afternoon. The analogy was fitting, but also truly amazing because Gebre doesn't speak, hear or see. Instead, he senses his surroundings. The young native of Eritrea (a small country in Africa) was very inquisitive, asking questions and providing input on what he had witnessed during the day. His interpreter, Anita Harding, who is hearing impaired, assisted Gebre in answering questions via a three-way sign language conversation with Karen Carlson. The trio was part of a 44-person group from the Seattle Light House for the Blind which visited the llamas, camels and garden at the farm on Big Valley Road. Gebre explained that, from what he learned, llamas' fur not only protects them from the sun, but also keeps them warm in the winter. When asked what types of animals flourished in his native country, he signed, I grew up here in America. But in Eritrea, we have lots of horses. "

Forecasters were wrong!

"The summer predicted to have so many problems in North Kitsap ended up to be one of our very best. Back in May, when gas prices soared, local businesses were openly worried that the tourists who fuel downtown Poulsbo and neighboring economies with their dollars might stay home. It turned out not to be a problem. Visitors who may have gulped hard at the gas pump total, nonetheless came in large numbers to enjoy the balmy, sunny days. "

City beefs up traffic safety at schools

State grant will cover OT for traffic patrols.

Port of Poulsbo seeking commissioner applicants

'Help wanted' ad campaign comes up short.

Lining up for a tragedy

"Long lines of parked cars have been a frequent sight in Kingston and Bainbridge this summer as ferry overflows have forced drive-on travelers to park on the highway shoulder and wait for the next Because of bridge construction, a two-boat schedule, and just plain gorgeous summer weekend weather, the lines of cars along the highways have become longer than ever. People frequently wait in their cars for hours, especially on Sunday afternoons and evenings. "

Volleyball sets up for 2000

Athletes hope to improve in this year's standings.

Parents give Gordon portables a facelift

"KINGSTON - Last weekend, parents came to Gordon Elementary with shovels, rakes, and tape measurers - ready to get to work. Gordon Elementary has moved the Options program, for the first time ever, entirely into the six portables behind the school. So, parents decided to give the area a bit of a facelift. They helped build a stage for the program's plays. They pulled weeds and planted trees. They hooked up computer cables. We organized it all by e-mail, said Carrie Snyder, who has two children in the program, sons Robbie and Ben. Snyder said the change is impressive. It's unbelievable, you wouldn't believe it, Snyder said. It looks great. No one would recognize it as the same place. "

Taking a holistic new look at careers

"POULSBO - Sometimes tragedy can be a good thing. It certainly was for Maria Marsala. The native New Yorker (like thousands of people across the nation each year) was involved in a serious car accident while residing on the east coast. But instead of taking the why me? approach to the incident, Marsala instead took stock of her life. Following the crash, Marsala completed what she called her life resumé, in which she jotted down every single job (paid and unpaid) she ever had The resume offered her true insight into what field she was really meant to work in. Having experience as a Wall Street trader (not as stressful as managing, she said), a consultant and a teacher among other occupations, Marsala found that she had the potential to be a great coach. It was one of those things that just popped up at me, she explained with a smile, accompanied with what she called a slow-Brooklyn accent. "

Team waits for starting gun

"POULSBO - Cross-country is unlike any other sport, said coach Katie Savage. Savage should know. She also coaches the North Kitsap High School track team, and she said that the cross-country season, which begins Sept. 7, is different. It's not the distance that makes it difficult, she said of the sport, which requires the athletes to run between 2.8 and 3.1 miles. It's that it's off-road. So, Savage said, the runners will often find themselves winding through trails, crunching on gravel, and evading obstacles. The strategies are very different (than track), she said. There's a lot more lateral movement, so your ankles have to be flexible. "

NK soccer team kicking off new season

"POULSBO - When Teri Ishihara looked at the practice field Thursday afternoon, she saw more than two teams of soccer players battling it out. She saw a load of potential. Potential is a word that comes up often connected to the North Kitsap High School 2000 girls' soccer team, a team loaded with talent and looking to improve on last year's showing. This year's our year, said Lindsey Ross, a senior and co-captain of the team. "