Even though two-year-old Maggie is a beloved pet, she is subjected to breed-based discrimination in municipalities that ban pit bulls. Proposed legislation would make allowances for well-behaved canines regardless of pedigree. Photo by Tessa Kriechbaumer

Even though two-year-old Maggie is a beloved pet, she is subjected to breed-based discrimination in municipalities that ban pit bulls. Proposed legislation would make allowances for well-behaved canines regardless of pedigree. Photo by Tessa Kriechbaumer

Profiled pooch owners may be able to appeal breed-based bans in cities

WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Cities that ban certain dog breeds would have to provide an appeal process for owners under proposed legislation that makes exceptions for good dogs of outlawed pedigree.

According to DogsBite, a nonprofit organization that advocates for victims of dog maulings, 28 cities in Washington have ordinances that restrict or ban ownership of pit bull terriers, or declare the entire breed as “potentially dangerous” or “dangerous.”

House Bill 1026 was originally aimed at prohibiting a ban on specific dog breeds in local jurisdictions. But a substitute bill that passed through committee on Jan. 31, would still allow the breed bans, while requiring jurisdictions to implement an appeals process.

“People make dogs dangerous, dogs aren’t born dangerous,” said prime sponsor Rep. Sherry Appleton, D-Poulsbo. “It’s discriminatory to tell someone that they can’t live in your town because of the member of their family.”

Through the appeals process, specific dogs may be exempt from the regulations if they pass a canine behavioral test. If the dog passes, it would be exempt to possession prohibitions for two years, and subject to a retest to maintain the exemption. If the dog fails the test, it may retake the test within a reasonable period of time.

Representative Jenny Graham, R-Mead, voted yes on the bill as it stands now, but does support local jurisdictions being able to create breed-based bans.

“At one and a half I was bitten by a German shepherd—I bear the scars still—eight times in the head and face. I’m lucky to be alive, and that was a German Shepherd,” said Rep. Graham. “With the bigger dogs that are capable of hurting or killing there needs to be some protection there.”

The bill was voted out of committee 8-2 with a “do pass” recommendation, and has not been scheduled for a floor debate.

More in News

A little parade watcher exchanges a wave with a princess on a float. (Bob Smith | Kitsap News Group)
Summer weather returns just in time for Fathoms parade

Absent for two straight summers, parade watchers soak in the fun and sun

.
Toddler survives fentanyl overdose; mom arrested

Poulsbo child, 2, is alert; long-term effects unknown

The Planned Parenthood clinic in Bremerton. Courtesy Photo
Bremerton Planned Parenthood vows to provide access

Roe v. Wade overturned by US Supreme Court

The Timber Run sign inside the apartment property. Elisha Meyer/Port Orchard Independent Photos
Rent hike could leave some homeless

Some residents at a Port Orchard apartment complex are scrambling to find… Continue reading

.
All events back on for Kingston 4th of July

Parade at noon; fireworks at 10 p.m.

A map of the North Kitsap region where many trail segments are being considered for the North Sound to Olympics Trail. Courtesy Graphic
Planning discussed for North Sound to Olympics Trail

Kitsap County Public Works held an open house Wednesday at the Village… Continue reading

.
Turning 105 is no big deal for Mary DeLaGrange

Port Orchard birthday girl just wants her family to enjoy some cake

Animal Emergency & Specialty Center has expanded its services and is now located at College Marketplace in Poulsbo. Courtesy Photo
Poulsbo animal hospital moves, expands services

Animal Emergency & Specialty Center, formerly known as Animal Emergency & Trauma… Continue reading

The donated concrete floats were towed to the Port of Poulsbo for complete refurbishment and reuse in the new floating breakwater. Courtesy Photo
Construction of new Poulsbo breakwater begins

Will be ready for public by next year

Most Read