From 2019, a family successfully cuts down its own tree at the farm. Courtesy Olmstead Tree Farms

From 2019, a family successfully cuts down its own tree at the farm. Courtesy Olmstead Tree Farms

Poulso tree farms to provide delivery service

Adapting to a worldwide pandemic, Olmstead Tree Farms in Poulsbo is offering a delivery service for people who want a “real” tree for Christmas, but want to remain COVID safe.

“This year because of COVID we wanted to be prepared in case for some reason we couldn’t open any of our locations,” said Kassie Olmstead, co-owner of the farm. “I think we are safe, but as an added option we are offering contactless delivery within Kitsap County and we have varying delivery fees depending on where a customer lives.”

The farm does not open to the public until the day after Thanksgiving, but there are two ways for customers to get their trees delivered.

The first is similar to any other online retailer, customers can go to olmsteadtreefarms.com and choose from three sizes of Noble Fir trees, schedule a delivery time, and it will be delivered.

The second option is only being offered at Olmstead Tree Farms Poulsbo location on Clear Creek Road, where folks can cut down their own tree and then have it delivered, which allows for more tree types to choose from and cheaper cost.

“I think people will be pretty appreciative to be able to not have to have to venture out if they don’t want to, and even if they want to come to our farm it’s outdoors so they might feel a little bit safer. But also the convenience of having a tree delivered is going to be a big thing,” Olmstead said.

The Olmstead Tree Farms central location in Poulsbo has provided many families with fond memories of picking out and cutting down their own Christmas trees, which families can still do this year, but will be asked to mask up and follow other COVID-safe guidelines.

Staff also will be following coronavirus protocols.

Olmstead also provided some good advice for folks hesitant to buy a “real” tree for the holidays due to fire concerns and the work needed to keep the tree alive.

“We provide every tree with a fresh cut and you have about an hour to get it in the water before the sap seals it again. We tell people if they aren’t going to put it in the water right away give it a fresh cut when you get it home,” Olmstead said. “Also, a big thing that people don’t think about is keeping it away from a heat source. Even like a heating vent can really dry out your tree and keep it as far away as you can from fireplaces and wood stoves.”

Olmstead Tree Farms has been in the Christmas tree business for over 50 years. The family owned and operated company started in Bremerton, with Paul and Vivian Olmstead delivering trees door to door in the Eldorado Hills neighborhood. Since then, their youngest son Josh has taken over the family business, which now has 10 acres of trees and multiple locations for folks to pick up pre-cut trees all over Kitsap County.

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