Never too young to learn about history

While you're never too old to learn something new the reverse can also be true. This Saturday children ages 4-6 and their parents can learn about the history of the Suquamish tribe as part of the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum's Kinder History program.

“While you’re never too old to learn something new the reverse can also be true. This Saturday children ages 4-6 and their parents can learn about the history of the Suquamish tribe as part of the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum’s Kinder History program. The monthly series exploring Bainbridge Island’s history began in November with the first installment of Our Suquamish Neighbors. During the two and a half hour session children tried traditional foods, learned about the importance of the cedar tree to the tribe’s culture, heard traditional stories, and learned weaving techniques with paper. About five children and their parents attended the first class. Our Suquamish Neighbors Part II is scheduled from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., Jan, 13 at the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum Strawberry Hills Center. A field trip to the Suquamish Museum is also planned. Cost for the session is $19 for parent and child who are museum members and $24 for non-members. You’re never too young to understand and learn about the history of the area, said Stacy Pecha, who teaches the classes. As far as grasping the history lessons, the younger students do just fine. Five-year-olds can be intelligent little people too, she said. Her young audience is a little different age group than what she is used to. For several years she has taught seventh grade at Klahowya Middle School. She took a year off from teaching after having twin girls. This Saturday kids will have the chance to try steamed clams and learn more about the culture. Marilyn Jones, director for the Suquamish Museum, said learning about history early on is crucial. The earlier the better. It gets them away from the stereotypes. It’s kind of like planting a seed, she said. The KinderHistory program is modeled after the KinderZoo program at the San Diego Zoo, said Bainbridge Historical Museum director Joan Piper. Piper, who used to work for the zoo, said the program generated a lot of interest and proved successful. She hoped to spark that same level of interest in Bainbridge’s rich history. Upcoming sessions include the history of the logging industry and early settlers. To register call Joan Piper at (206) 842-2773. “

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