Kitsap Point-In-Time homelessness count starts Jan. 22

Volunteers are still needed to assist countywide effort

PORT ORCHARD — Picking up where it left off last year, Kitsap County is marshaling people power to once again conduct surveys to better determine the scope of homelessness throughout the county.

The survey, called the Kitsap County Point-In-Time Count, will take place Jan. 22-25. The data gathered will be used to inform local, state and federal funders about the needs in the community in order to combat the homelessness issue.

Volunteers will help survey individuals at centralized social-service locations and at areas in which homeless individuals live, spend time and receive services.

Cory Derenburger, a housing and homelessness program specialist for the county, said more volunteers are needed to take part in the survey. Adults “from all walks of life,” including college students, members of civic organizations, service providers and veterans, are encouraged to sign up online at tiny.cc/PIT2019 or contact Derenburger at cderenbu@co.kitsap.wa.us or 360-337-7287.

He said volunteers don’t need experience — and training will be provided. Positions range from surveying individuals and families who visit local service providers, food banks, shelters and community meal sites “to finding those living without homes in many different situations and locations,” Derenburger said. Those who are bilingual are especially encouraged to sign up.

The volunteers will assist people from the Kitsap County Department of Human Services and Kitsap Continuum of Care Coalition with the survey.

The project will begin at 9 a.m. and run through 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 22 with Port Orchard Project Connect. The following day, Jan. 23, volunteers will take part in the count with the Bremerton Project Connect effort from 5-7 p.m. during evening meals.

On Jan. 24, outreach efforts will take place from 6:30-10 a.m. throughout the county. Kingston Project Connect work kicks off at 9 a.m. at food banks, then from 5-7 p.m. at evening meal locations. Finally, on Jan. 25 — the final day of the count — volunteers will conduct survey work in the morning at food banks, followed by evening meal counts at unspecified locations.

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